Girl makes crazy claims about being hit by a bus. But when she meets this one person—she knows

She started talking about it when she was just 3 years old
February 4, 2018 10:07 am Last Updated: February 4, 2018 10:07 am

From a very young age, Purnima would fully describe the process for manufacturing incense, — something a girl her age and not in the incense business wouldn’t have any knowledge about that unless she did it or came from a family of incense makers.

She claims to have lived as a male incense manufacturer named Jinidasa, who was struck and killed by a bus, years before she was born.

She was able to describe the location of the man’s house, and even remembered the exact manner in which she was run over by the bus and died.

This all seemed like a lot for a little girl to know. But the thing is, the man actually existed.

Jinidasa’s family, who lived hundreds of miles away from Purnima’s, confirmed that everything Purnima claims is true, and they view her as a reincarnation of the man.

When Purnima met the man’s family for the first time, she recognized all of the family members, even calling one of Jinidasa’s sisters, “her younger sister,” despite Purnima being younger than her.

The girl also bore birthmarks on the left side of her chest, in the same spot where Jinidasa had his fatal injuries.

“When I saw the family, I realized that rebirth was something real,” Purnima said.

For decades, there have been countless reports of young children talking about a past life they had, in vivid detail.

There is no concrete evidence on what happens when we die, and all we can do is speculate. And the debate on the existence of an afterlife is one that has been ongoing for centuries.

Reincarnation is one understanding about the afterlife, which is defined as when one’s soul transfers into a different body after passing away.

And there has been evidence of reincarnation being a possibility, but not in the way that you think.

(Pexels / Samuel Silitonga)

A certain pattern is common among these children — it begins when they learn to speak usually around age 2, and they would talk about their past lives.

Real Stories did a documentary on this concept; children who had claimed to remember a past life. They were interviewed, and investigations would be conducted to look if the person they were referring to actually existed.

One of the best documented cases of this involves Purnima, a girl from Sri Lanka, who had started talking about her past life at three years old.

(YouTube / Real Stories)

An article from University of Virginia Magazine chronicles other children and their stories, with one person researching it all.

A professor at the University of Virginia has over 2,500 cases of potential reincarnations sitting in his office.

(Pexels / Pixabay)

Professor, Jim B. Tucker, has spent decades researching these kinds of cases, and thinks that science is the key to it all.

“Quantum physics indicates that our physical world may grow out of our consciousness,” Tucker stated.

This is the basis for a theory that the material world is one that is made up entirely by the brain. Because of this, our consciousnesses doesn’t depend on the world to exist.

Therefore, once we die, our consciousness can get attached to a new brain and start a new life.

According to Tucker’s studies, 70% of children studied say that their previous life was cut short by a tragedy.

And obviously, this would apply to someone like Purnima.

One out of five children studied recall an intermission — the time between their death and being born into a new life.

For young children to talk something as seemingly crazy as that, can make people wonder if reincarnation is actually a thing.

Of course, one must take into account that children can have vivid imaginations, and these stories could be completely fabricated by them. But given how many of these stories can actually be backed up by evidence that these people the kids speak of lived and died, who is to say otherwise?

Either way, the studies will continue until enough evidence can prove it right, or wrong.